Sample Annotated Bibliography on Smartphones

Summary

Hingorani, Kamal, Woodard, Donald and Askari-DaneshNasrin. Exploring How Smartphones Support Students’ Lives. Issues in Information Systems. 2012. 13(2): 33-40

The article demystifies the use of smartphones by students and all stakeholders in the education system. Hingorani and others argue there is an increased demand for connectivity among students, universities and the educators in shaping their curricula. A smartphone is becoming a pervasive device among students and has eminent positive impacts on their educational lives. According to this article, young adults remain the most likely to use a smartphone with 53% users aged 18 to 24 and 63% aged 25 to 34 in the United States of America. Hingorani acknowledges the fact that the use of smartphones has some adverse impacts in school; hence, most of the institutions ban the use of mobile phones in class. Some professors encounter difficulties teaching while the students are busy sending messages.

Conversely, the use of smartphones in class has an array of advantages to both the students and teachers. Connectivity is much enhanced in education matters where tutors can give assignments via internet without meeting physically with the students. Smartphones are internet connected and students can search for an item they are learning in class directly from their phones without visiting the library. The article also identifies Nomophobia among university students which is the fear of being without a mobile phone. Hingorani and others found out that the use of smartphones is profound in school and it has both positive and negative impacts.The article concludes by saying that universities will continue to shape their curriculums to meet the demands of increasingly connected students.

Assessment

As mentioned in the article, most of the youths aged 18 to 35 are interacting with their smartphones each minute. Similarly, there is a construct of living without a mobile phone which is referred to as nomophobia. This can be detrimental to a person’s academic performance due to the emotion imbalance caused by the fear of staying without a smartphone. The articles demographic demonstrate that the frequency of smartphone use increases along the students ‘education levels. Therefore, smartphones are consistent in the school system.

Usable information

It is evidential that the use of smartphone in education system is increasingly becoming paramount. “With the technological advancement, mobile devices are equipped with numerous accessories that enable people to handle different tasks with one device.”For instance, a smartphone has calculator, navigator and maps which can aid a student to calculate time and distance of another geographical location. Computer information system students are reported to be the most predominant in the use of smartphones. This is due to the nature of their course, which requires retrieval of information each minute. “Lecturers are also included in this bandwagon due to the effectiveness attributed to the use of smartphones. They email the students with lectures, notes, and assignments which they retrieve from their smartphones.” The new digital environment presents an array of possibilities for communication, interaction and retrieval of the information.

The entire university programs require connectivity due to the increased number of students. There are online libraries, students register for their courses on online platforms among other activities. Similarly, students who enroll for e learning rely on their devices to attend their lessons. “Mobile phones contain an amalgamation of gadgets and accessories that comprehend the students’ needs.” Therefore, the use of smartphones is integral among students in their education; hence, universities will continue to shape their curriculums to meet the demands of increasingly connected students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work cited

Hingorani, Kamal, Woodard, Donald and Askari-DaneshNasrin. Exploring How Smartphones Support Students’ Lives. Issues in Information Systems. 2012. 13(2): 33-40