Sample Article Review on Effects of video and mobile games on children 

Singh .P, Mujawar.N, Mharkar.R and Kaur . H (2016) .Effect of Video and Mobile                                                             Games on Children’s Behavior, Indian Journal of Health and Wellbeing 2016, 7(5), 488-492

Effects of video and mobile games on children

Children prefer to play video or mobile games rather than engage with their peers. Playing video and mobile phone games has negative effects on children which leads to poor academic performance. This research was conducted to analyze the effects of video and mobile games on children. The research was conducted using the child and adolescent inpatient behavioral rating scale . The research shows the negative impacts of video and mobile games on children.

The research states that “children who play a lot of video games are more likely to experience high levels of anxiety, communication problem, psychomotor activity, conduct disorder, poor social skills, and hyperactive behaviors (Singh, Mujawar, Mharkar and Kaur, 2016) . The researchers used playing video and mobile games as the independent variable and the effects this has on children as the dependent variable. The effects of playing video and mobile games were influenced by the amount of time spent on the games.

Theis research shows how many negative effects playing video and mobile games have on children.  The children’s behavior was analyzed based on; anxiety, depression, communication problem, psychomotor activity, attention, conduct, social skills, eating habits, and sleeping habit. The research indicates that playing video and mobile games has adverse negative effects on children. Boys showed high effects compared to girls who showed mild responses.

Questionnaires were given to 160 boys and girls 80 boys and 80 girls aged 7-10 years picked randomly from 9 public schools in central Nagpur India. The boys spent more time playing video and mobile games than the girls. The boys reported high severe effects and low mild effects as compared to girls who reported high mild effects and low severe effects. The independent and dependent variables were measured by subjecting the children to different amounts of time playing video games.

The research evaluated a range of the effects of playing video and mobile games. I second the conclusion that playing video games negatively affects children. They supplied evidence to help the reader determine the amount of harm playing video and mobile games has on children. However the researchers generalized on mobile games.  Some mobile games like chess help children develop critical thinking. According to      (Redmond, 2010) Video games improve communication and strengthens family bonds. The researchers included citations they did not have facts on like the citation of the psychology of popular media culture which argues that some video games increase a child’s concentration.

I support the conclusion that playing video games could lead to violent children who are not empathetic. I disagree that playing some video games could lead to increased short-term concentration and reduced long-term concentration. Playing these games for 2- 3 hours requires a lot of concentration hence the children develop long-term concentration. New ideas were introduced stating that video games help a child develop short-term concentration and watching television has worse effects than playing video and mobile games.

Video games have negative effects on children. they make children violent, aggressive,  impulsive, and less empathetic. Parents should prevent children from playing video and mobile games. Teach them to socialize and participate in healthy activities like sports and reading books.

Reference

Redmond. L, (2010).Effect of  Video Games on Family Communication and Interaction, Master of Science Thesis, Lowa State University.

Singh .P, Mujawar.N, Mharkar.R and Kaur. H (2016) .Effect Of Video And Mobile                                                             Games On Children’s Behavior, Indian Journal of Health and Wellbeing 2016, 7(5), 488-492