Sample Essay on The Impact of Cultural and Creative Industries on Society

The Impact of Cultural and Creative Industries on Society

Introduction

Cultural and creative industries have become progressively significant to economic interests hence signifying that human ingenuity is the eventual financial reserve and that the modern industries will highly rely on the creation of knowledge through novelty and creativeness. The identification of the significance of cultural and creative industries results in the perception that, even as the industrial share of the economies across the globe declines, other types of ventures are achieving significance. On this note, the British Department for Culture, Media and Sport amplified the notion through the appointment of the creative sectors for the British market and development of the strategy to inspire intensification (Hesmondhalgh & Baker 2013). The reality that the financial system had been structurally transformed turned out to be more evident when the rate of employment became higher in the cultural and creative industries when judged against the rest of the market. The same case has also been witnessed in many other nations that have dedicated their focus on cultural and creative industries. Nonetheless, it has been established that through interrelations with other fields, the cultural and creative industries encourage advancement in the wider economy. Hinged on this is the anticipation that the cultural and creative industries have a crucial task in addressing the vital societal difficulties associated with sustainability, the excellence of life and the support of the global society.

Significance on the Economy

Cultural and creative industries have a vital and fundamental factor of a novel, fruitful and self-aware society. The government rather than the economy drew attention to the cultural and creative industries, which signifies the strength and dynamism of culture. The notion of the cultural and creative industries and the economy as contraries lost significance and the focus was drawn to their shared benefits. The implied viewpoint shows that that cultural and creative industries and economy reinforce one another. The use of economic standards supports the cultural and creative industries while the economy is turning increasingly artistic and innovative. The excellence of cultural and inventive products generated in a market setting is not by description inferior to civilization and innovativeness that emanates from government financing. Moreover, entrepreneurship enhances not just the flexibility but as well the self-sufficiency of the cultural and creative field, and vice versa. On this note, it is evident that, in diverse ways, cultural and creative industries boost the economy (Moeran & Pedersen 2011). Culture and innovativeness create dynamism in cities, generates the raw materials for identity, persuades tourists to draw closer and use their money, encourages inventiveness and yields a new setting where ground-breaking ventures can prosper quickly. The benefit of the development of cultural and creative industries is that culture and art are highly esteemed from an economic standpoint, and the demerit is that inventiveness or economic strategies will mask cultural approaches. Such a disparity may deprive culture and art of their fundamental strength and social position, and might, therefore, decrease their implication for the economy.

Fundamental Nature of the Cultural and Creative Industries

Even though the term ‘cultural and creative industry’ was not existent in the past, the diverse undertakings that are encompassed in the sector were extant. A number of the activities, for instance, publication of books and visual arts, have been practiced for a very long time. Nevertheless, such activities are currently under cultural and creative industries, amidst many other endeavors such as T.V., gaming, and radio to mention a few. On this note, it is apparent that cultural and creative industries include dissimilar varieties of activities and ventures that generate products that are the outcome of personal, and usually shared, innovative tasks and entrepreneurship. What typifies the cultural and creative industries are the fundamental roles of content, originality, and symbolism. The groups and ventures in the cultural and creative sectors offer consumers a broad scope of products that reinforce their implication and denote symbolic worth. Cultural and creative products offer the clients an experience of not merely artistic but as well fiscal worth. Hence, the cultural and creative industries have a significant task in the nurturing and retaining of lifestyles and cultural identity in the society, generating and increasing employment opportunities and adding value in the marketplace. The products, their significance, uniqueness and the lifestyle that they signify are generated, shaped and enhanced by the cultural and creative industries and mark a source of economic importance that is turning out to be more apparent not merely to governments but as well to investors and other stakeholders in the entrepreneurship field. Additionally, the recent attention has come to rest solidly on the significance of the cultural and creative industries in novelty and the economy at large. The ingenuity in this field acts as a channel for improvement and competition in the economic aspects (Cooke & De Propris 2011).

International Trend

Cultural and creative industries are internationally significant and have been widely appreciated as key types of business ventures in nearly all nations. The industries are approximated to generate a close to 3% of the Gross National Product in the European Union (Lazzeretti 2012). The cultural and creative industries account for over 3% of the chances of employment in the European Union thus proving to be bigger when compared to the Information Technology sector and the automotive industry. In China, there are diverse clusters in the cities where the cultural and creative industries are found to represent about 2.5% of the Gross National Product. Singapore has facilitated the development of the cultural and creative industries for a long time and has taken media, design, and art as the keystones, which currently hold a resourceful center. Moreover, Japan has an extensive track account in the creation of skillfully made hardware for the use of audiovisual information, in addition to ventures in the entertainment industries around the world. The cultural and creative industries in Australia account for nearly 4% of all employment opportunities in the country.

The US acts as the source of the large-scale entertainment and media sectors with Hollywood taking the leading position as a key producer of cultural and creative products for many years. In the US, more than 2% of the labor force operates in the cultural and creative fields. To add to the significance of the cultural and creative industries is the fraction of the internal revenue coming from the existing copyright sectors (Andres & Chapain 2013). In America, the generation of income by the cultural and creative industries is both implicitly and explicitly accountable for 11% of the Gross National Product, which makes the US the global leader. Information from a wide pool of studies in conjunction with United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization establish that in about 75% of every nation studied, the cultural and creative industries generate from 3% to 12% of the Gross National Product.

Creative Ability as a Crucial Aspect

The cultural and creative industries signify platforms of development where people are required considerably mainly because of their human capacity: creative talent (Culture 2016). It is not the vast deployment of employees or the possession of quality natural supplies that establishes the influence of countries or markets though the existence of powerful business communities and adequate investment resources are also essential. Nevertheless, it is the presence of ample creative ability, both in and exterior to the cultural and creative sectors, that influences the economic strength and cultural potential. In the cultural and creative market, both the economy and culture reap from a similar source. The skills that are fundamental to the artistic industry are similarly vital for inventiveness. It is not a concurrence that the sectors of novelty and art have similar aspects and at times overlapping elements. Many artists deconstruct and untangle expertise from a social or artistic point of view. They ensure that the created channels of development are apparent, for instance, in the life sciences and Information Technology. The created channels are at times ignored in the primary field of technical design. In biotechnology, most ethical inquiries occur regarding the integrity of a person’s body and novelty whereas Information Technology results in the discourse on the position of an individual’s surroundings in the digital network system. Art mostly signifies alternative channels of innovation that have a social significance, aim, and utilization that may have otherwise remained unexploited.

Novelty demands a keen explorative advance to expertise and its connotations, and could offer tremendous benefits with respect to the reinforcement of social networks and the product diversity of the cultural and creative industries (Culture 2016). The task and significance of creative ability and the manner in which it is associated with economic aspects, especially with respect to the promise of the creative sectors thus calls for a greater consideration of the strategies pertinent to the cultural and creative industries. When it comes to the deliberations on such plans, education takes a crucial position. The explanation to the inquiry regarding the specific skills and abilities necessary for success in the cultural and creative industries gains meaning from the contemporary developments. This entails an amalgamation of design, examination, and free enterprise, as well as the practical application of knowledge concerning the social demands and market potentials. The success of cultural and creative industries has a direct attribute of the way institutions of learning nurture young talents. Taking such policies into consideration, the principal focus does not just lie on the facilitation of businesses but as well, and possibly squarely, on the creation of a foundation of creative abilities that could employ the innovative guarantee.

Through exploitation of creative abilities, cultural and creative industries have a fundamental role to play in the redevelopment of environments and making them more livable. In this regard, both the material and immaterial resources are employed as much as achievable for this reason. The participation in cultural undertakings enriches people through equipping them with skills and cultural capital that achieve success in different facets of human culture. Moreover, the cultural and creative sectors are deemed significant facets of the inventive climate since they assist in the attraction and retention of artistic, inventive capacity. This capability, which could be applied in the cultural and creative industries (though can be used in many other fields) is crucial for areas that promote the objective of being amid the most innovative schemes. Cultural and creative industries are rising at the local and international levels as significant interlinking components that may culturally, economically and socially better people and nations at large (Johnsonaug 2015).

Conclusion

Cultural and creative industries have become gradually noteworthy to economic concerns hence signifying that human cleverness is the eventual financial reserve and that the modern industries will exceedingly rely on the creation of knowledge through novelty and creativeness. However, it has been ascertained that through interrelations with other fields, the cultural and creative industries hearten advancement in the wider economy. There is an existing anticipation that the cultural and creative industries have a crucial task in addressing the imperative public difficulties associated with sustainability, the excellence of life and the support of all-inclusive societies. Cultural and ingenious products offer the customers an experience of not merely artistic but as well financial worth. Hence, cultural and creative sectors have a momentous task in the nurturing and retaining of ways of life and cultural distinctiveness in the society, generating and growing employment opportunities and adding significance in the marketplace. The cultural and creative industries create platforms of development where people are required noticeably because of their human aptitude: creative talent. Through utilization of creative abilities, cultural and creative industries have an elemental responsibility in the revitalization of environments and making them more inhabitable. To sum it up, cultural and creative industries are intensifying at the local and global levels as significant interlinking components that may culturally, economically and collectively better people and countries at large.

Reference List

Andres, L & Chapain, C 2013, ‘The integration of cultural and creative industries into local and regional development strategies in Birmingham and Marseille: Towards an inclusive and collaborative governance?’, Regional Studies, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 161-182.

Cooke, P & De Propris, L 2011, ‘A policy agenda for EU smart growth: The role of creative and cultural industries’, Policy Studies, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 365-375.

Culture 2016, viewed 31 January 2016, <http://ec.europa.eu/culture/policy/cultural-creative-industries/index_en.htm>.

Hesmondhalgh, D & Baker, S 2013, Creative labor: Media work in three cultural industries, Routledge, London.

Johnsonaug, S 2015, ‘The creative apocalypse that wasn’t’, The New York Times Magazine, 19 August, viewed 31 January 2016, <http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/23/magazine/the-creative-apocalypse-that-wasnt.html?_r=0>.

Lazzeretti, L 2012, ‘Cultural and creative industries’, Creative Industries and Innovation in Europe: Concepts, Measures and Comparative Case Studies, vol. 57, no. 2, p.1.

Moeran, B & Pedersen, J 2011, Negotiating values in the creative industries: Fairs, festivals and competitive events, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.