Sample Grand Proposal Paper on Early Childhood Carries

Early Childhood Carries

Abstract

Early Childhood Carries refers to the incidence of one or more decayed tooth surfaces that mostly affect preschool aged children between birth and 71 months of age. It is a significant public health issue that is found in both selected and general populations. In this regard, it is essential for dentists and professionals in this field to create awareness to the public concerning this matter. Parents need to recognize that their children’s teeth are vulnerable to decay as soon as they start to occur.

It is also vital for people to notice that Early Childhood Carries is an infectious disease, and as soon as their children’s teeth begin to suffer, they should make an appointment with dentists. From these visits, parents and caregivers learn various ways to reduce the dangers of Early Childhood Caries. This paper articulates challenges such as poverty that low-income children encounter, which subject them to high odds of having tooth decay (Wadhawan 54). As a result, they experience the most severe pain, hence more likelihood to have untreated tooth related issues. The main purpose of this essay is to create awareness to the public about early childhood carries and prevent it from spreading.

According to national statistics from the Children’s Dental Health Project, one indicator of the problem is 80% of tooth decay is concentrated in 25% of children. This affects children from low-income families, and to assist them, it is vital to contribute funds that will cater for all. This will require a total budget of $6,000-8,000 per case in order to cover a full rate. This project will take duration of three months to allow dentists to access all children with tooth decay. Assessing the entire issue, there is need for all public institutions such as local pediatric offices, local dental offices, and schools to collaborate. This is to prevent early childhood carries among children and enhance a healthy society.

Problem Statement

In Jonathan Kozal’s book, Savage Inequality, he describes the poor oral health of low-income children and states that “children will live for months with pain that grown-ups would find unendurable.” Dr. Burton Edelstein, founder of the Children’s Dental Health Project, has said that “dental pain is like walking around with a rock in your shoe. You can learn to live with it, but it dramatically affects your overall well-being (p.1).” Tooth decay remains the most prevalent disease in childhood, and low income is the greatest predictor for development of early childhood tooth decay.

Low-income children have the highest odds of having tooth decay, experiencing the most severe pain and are those more likely to have untreated tooth related issues. It is known that low income children in Westchester county, specifically Yonkers, are also the least likely to visit a dentist, because of both access to care issues and many parents lacking understanding of the importance of good oral health. Evidence is increasingly showing links between oral health and general health. In addition to how oral diseases affect children, there are high costs associated with treating dental problems. For every child who has to have his/her teeth repaired under general anesthesia at a surgery center or operating room, the average cost in Westchester is estimated at $6,000-8,000 per case (full rate). These costs do not include risks to the child associated with general anesthesia.

Goals/Objectives

The objective of this project is to ensure that;

  • Prevent tooth decay challenge that face children
  • Caregivers impart knowledge to parents about good oral health
  • We meet the required budget to benefit all poor children in society and restore their health
  • We create awareness in all public institutions such as hospitals and schools to enhance a healthy community (Wadhawan 68).

Timeline for this proposed project is intended to be a duration of three months to ensure that dentists access all the needy children suffering from tooth decay. First, it will involve identification efforts, then planning by contributing funds to assist them all to get medication.

Methodology

A recent study from the University of North Carolina showed that children who had an early preventive visit stage one could have a reduction in dental costs of close to 50% by age five. This reduction in costs does not measure the reduction in disability, pain, lost school days, lost work for parents or sleepless nights that children with severe tooth decay experience (Pediatric dental health p.4). Yet in Yonkers and nationally, more emphasis has been put on treating the disease rather than preventing it. According to national statistics from the Children’s Dental Health Project, indicators of the problem are: 80% of tooth decay is concentrated in 25% of children. Children ages 2-11 in families with income under $20,000 are nearly twice as likely to experience decay as children in families with twice that income level (55% vs. 31%) Children in poverty are more than twice as likely to have untreated cavities as their higher income peers (33% vs. 13%).

The 2005 Yonkers Oral Health Survey of third graders indicated that 67% of the children screened have had decay (compared to 63% in 1995-1997). Of those, 30% needed treatment and 5% needed urgent care because of pain or infection. Evidence shared by the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile staff of the children they are seeing vividly illustrates the extent of the problem for low-income children, including cases such as a 15-year-old from Yonkers with decay on 71 surfaces in his mouth. There was also a seven-year-old with six abscesses in her mouth, and a four-year old who had such severe early childhood caries that her front teeth were black and nearly crumbling. While these cases may be extreme, the Care Mobile staff estimates that one in 12 of the children seen through the program have had an abscess.

Additional statistics from the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile indicate that 24% of the patients seen in the past six months 5% do not brush their teeth daily and for 25% of the patients, their visit to the Care Mobile was their first dental visit. In Yonkers, the data from the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) report found 76% of parents/caregivers of Yonkers children ages 0-4 reported that their children had never visited a dentist. Almost 83% of those parents stated that the main reason for not having visited a dentist was that they “had no reason to go”. Based on the NY Department of Social Service’s annual Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) 416 Report, only 24% of Yonkers Medicaid eligible children ages one through five received any dental treatment services in 2005. The fact that dental caries is argumentably due in part to bacterial transmission from the primary caregiver to the child the need for interventions to occur is earlier in a child’s life (BRFSS p.15). Finally, Head Start statistics show that nearly 35% of Westchester children enrolled in Head Start were diagnosed to be in need of dental treatment in the 2004-2005 annual program.

Budget

For the Children’s Dental Health project to be successful, dentists should consider repairing children’s teeth under general anesthesia at a surgery center. This will require a total amount of $6,000-8,000 per case in order to cover a full rate. An average cost applies to all affected children in Westchester. However, this budgeted amount does not incorporate risks to the child associated with general anesthesia. We need this money to assist low-income children have the highest odds of having tooth decay, experiencing the most severe pain and are those more likely to have untreated tooth related issues.

For instance, this budgeted cash will be beneficial to Children ages 2-11 in families with income under $20,000 (Wadhawan 169). This is because they are nearly twice as likely to experience decay as children in families with twice that income level (55% vs. 31%). Furthermore, Children in poverty are more than twice as likely to have untreated cavities as contrasted to their higher income peers (33% vs. 13%). Is this amount is contributed to medical centers; dentists will be in a position to help all children and prevent cases of tooth problems that subject them to suffer.

 

   Public perception of cavities. No Big deal, just some fillings.

 

 

    Reality. This is a big deal.

 

Evaluation

A resolution for the ongoing problem and Early Childhood Caries is no easy task, but a progressively obtainable one. With collaboration between local pediatric offices, local dental offices, and schools, the number of children with no dental home can be lessened. This incorporates the Westchester Children’s Organization that is already operational. As a result, they have become very successful, implying that the resolution outreach begins at this point. Pamphlets should be made and delivered to all local pediatric offices, and maternity wards and elementary schools informing these facilities of the available services of this organization. Additionally, there should be a meeting held at the organization hall with each of these facility heads to discuss the intervention methods. All of these facilities should drum up a release form or informed consent form asking parents to give the name and phone number for the child to contact for dental care needs. With this consent form, the organization can have a running list of all children under the age of 6 in the local community to reach out to in reference of dental health.

Furthermore with this list, the organization can keep track of which children who experience regular oral care within these facilities and assess if other children are healthy (Wadhawan 216).  This should also be inclusive of elementary schools and the hospital where these children are born. Moreover, the pediatric offices and local dental offices where majority of the children who reside in town of Yonkers should also be accounted for. This is where the prevention should start, because prevention is deemed irrelevant if an individual is unaware of whom is in need. Once the needs list becomes available preventative measures should be enforced from there. This is to offer public health clinics to those without insurance, dental health or mobile van locations, and providing the preventative measures offered by the Westchester children’s organization. The major cause of the problem is lack of taking care of these children and short of knowledge among parents. In general, the entire society should put in efforts to tackle this issue to initiate the beginning stages of prevention to ensure that children are not affected by tooth carries.

References

Behavioral risk factor surveillance system. (2014 Data). Childhood oral health. Retrieved from: http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/questionnaires/pdf-ques/2014_brfss.pdf

Department Of Health (2005). Oral health status of third grade children: Yonkers, NY. Retrieved from: Http://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/dental/docs/child_oral_health_surveillance.pdf

Impact of oral disease in NY state. Retrieved from: https://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/dental/docs/impact_of_oral_disease.pdf

Pediatric dental health. Westchester County Department of Health. Retrieved from: http://health.westchestergov.com/dental-health

The Tooth Truck. Ronald McDonald mobile care van statistics. Retrieved from: http://www.rmhcozarks.org/tooth-truck/.

Wadhawan, S. (2003). Early childhood caries-related visits to hospitals for ambulatory surgery in New York State. Retrieved from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov