Sample Paper on When I was a child I learned as a child

When I was a child I learned as a child

Introduction

Adults present an incredible diversity given that some of them are responsible and successful while some are still ‘maturing’ per se. indeed, the style in which parents deal with their children aggressive and sexual desire may determine the child’s personality development (Taylor, Marienau & Fiddler, 2000). In essence, the development of personal traits occurs in diverse stages. Children passes through so many conflicts that subsequent6ly affects their development and may ultimately affect the quality of their emotional change and growth processes. When I was a child, I learned as a child through a direct observation of others around me. I acquired knowledge and behavior through finding a model who was the person demonstrating the behavior for someone else.

Social cognitive theory

The social reasoning theory describes a learning perspective that encompasses a child learning by observing what others are doing. For example, through observing my peers, I learnt how to perform the Electric Slide dancing styles and with time mastered this art of dancing. With time, I began believing in my own abilities as I now thoroughly understood electric slide dance moves (Berk & Winsler, 2005). There are a number of ways through which a child learns new skills and behaviors and acquires novel acquaintances and expertise in the course of their development.

Notably, the processes involved in learning are in most instances purely internal and may occasionally lead to a certain way thinking or a child to behave in a particular manner. The child can develop a completely new behavior through the learning and direct observation of the purported acts without much effects (Noddings, 2005). In the example of dance, I took several multiple parties on how the dance was performed until I joined in. Moreover, there is a goal-directed behavior in which a child sets own goals and thereafter direct the set behavior accordingly. From the dancing example, I was only motivated to learn to dance after observing the dancing moves time and again.

Social cognitive suggests that a behavior can eventually be self-regulated. Unlike behaviorists, social-cognitivist believe that people finally can standardize their actions and erudition. Taking my dance example, behaviorists suggest that the best way for a child to learn is through continuous buttressing encouragement from other people to improve. But for the social-cognitivist, they suggest that a learner is supposed to observe the models so as to improve own moves and then compare to the movements of the models. Also, the social-cognitivist do believe that punishment and reinforcement. A child forms expectations concerning the likely consequences based on the future responses about how the current responses are punished or reinforced.

Constructivism theory

This theory asserts that the inherent principles that govern the learning process should be in a position to create a meaning not only to learners but also to those who play positive roles among ensure mastery of new knowledge (Berk & Winsler, 2005). The theory introduces learners to a combination of elements that facilitate the ability to understand the environment and its usage based on a person’s insight and cognitive abilities. The theory suggests that the learners are supposed to build efficient knowledge through interacting with the environment stimuli in order to understand the major learning attributes (Noddings, 1995). Based on this theory, there is a general notion that the learning process will ensure focus, exposure, and contribution through questions among learners. During the assessment, learners are not taken through standardization tests, but grading based on personal achievements may be designed. The testing follows multiple choices with the focus on knowledge mastery in the specific subject or area of study. The method of assessment should appear in the learning process so that the learners can play important roles in probing their evolution.

For example, as a child I actively participated in critical thinking and problem solving regarding any activity that is relevant and requiring positive engagements.  I constructed my knowledge through challenging the tactics and concepts based on my previous experiences and acquaintances by applying them in new learning environments. I also incorporated the new knowledge that I gained in addition to the pre-existing intellectual constructs. Learning depends on the way information is mentally processed and the students cognitive processes are supposed to be the primary concern for the educators. The difficulties of the student may be attributed to inappropriate or ineffective cognitive processing, for example, the learning of the disabled may be less effective as compared to the nondisabled children because they take long to process information.

Maturation theory

Maturation theory affects leaning activities in schools especially those in early childhood classrooms. It is based on three assumptions that include growth has a biological source, noble and a depraved change of years and the body formations. It is mostly apprehensive with the biological progress and its relation to the overall development. The rate at which children develop depends primarily on the nervous growth system that typically comprises of the complicated network of a spinal cord, brain, and the nerve fibers. This is based on the assumption that minds develop and behaviors change accordingly as the nervous system develops (Taylor, Marienau, & Fiddler, 2000).

According to this theory, the genetic changes and psychological changes contribute to the growth and development of body structures and cognitive ability. Motor capabilities and brain development occur automatically without construction or any learning approach (Berk & Winsler, 2005). The change in abilities can be either sudden or gradual subject to the type of development. For example when I was learning to walk the result depended on the gradual changes in the psychological capabilities and the brain structure. Maturation changes are characterized to unfold through a fixed series sequences in the progression of a child’s life. The theory states that as the child’s cultural and social environments play a role in development (Noddings, 1995). The socializing forces are active mostly when they are symphonic with the schedule of inner maturation processes. When the nervous systems have matured sufficiently, children begin to the art of mastering various tasks that consist of walking and reasoning from their internal urges and cognition.

Conclusion

The style in which parents deal with their children aggressive and sexual desire may determine the child’s personality. The child can process the new behavior though the learning processes that may not be effected at a later point in life. Also, most of the learning practices puts more emphasis and significance on the learner’s exposure levels. Motor capabilities and brain development almost occur automatically without construction or learning. A child forms expectations concerning the likely consequences based on the future responses about how the current responses are punished or reinforced. The rate at which children develop depends primarily on the nervous growth system that comprises of the complicated network of a spinal cord, brain, and the nerve fibers.

 

References

Berk, L. E., & Winsler, A. (2005). Scaffolding Children’s Learning: Vygotsky and Early Childhood Education. NAEYC Research into Practice Series. Volume 7. National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1509 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036-1426 (NAEYC catalog# 146).

Noddings, N. (2004). Philosophy of education. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Taylor, K., Marienau, C., & Fiddler, M. (2000). Developing adult learners: Strategies for teachers and trainers. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.