Sample Research Paper on US Presidential Elections

The electors usually choose U.S presidents for a four-year term period. The registered voters are required to elect a candidate by voting. The candidate must have won the popular votes in the state in order to be voted for by the electors in the particular state. A candidate is required to have majority votes of 270 votes of the 538 Electoral College voters, senators, electors of the District of Columbia, and representatives from the state in order to win the elections[1]. The recent elections experienced so far are the 2004, 2008, and 2012 presidential elections. Each of these elections has its similarities and differences in various aspects.

The presidential elections of 2004 were held on Tuesday, November 2 2004 in which the Republican Party candidate President George Bush defeated Massachusetts Senator, John Kerry. Bush was re-elected for another term in office along with Vice President Dick Cheney. The US had experienced the Iraq invasion in 2003 therefore, President Bush campaigned under the banner of foreign policy and declared total war on the fight against terrorism[2].

Four years later, the US was scheduled for the 56th quadrennial presidential election that was held on Tuesday, November 4 2008 in which Senator Barack Obama and his running mate, Senator Joe Biden won against Senator John McCain and Governor Sarah Palin in the battle of the war between the Democratic Party and Republican Party. The Democratic Party under Obama’s watch won against the Republicans by winning both the popular vote and the Electoral College. Obama’s major campaign strategy was focused on bringing change and his campaign symbol was “Change We Need”[3]. President Obama focused to bring change to all sectors of the economy so as to ensure the country’s prosperity. This earned him his entry into Washington as the First Black American President.

In 2012, President Obama sought the electors to elect him for the second term. President Obama won the elections with his running Mate, Vice President Joe Biden against the former Governor of Massachusetts, Mitt Romney, and Representative of Wisconsin, Paul Ryan. Unlike the 2008 Democratic nomination in which Obama faced serious competition from Hilary Clinton, Obama was able to clinch the nomination easily[4] . However, unlike other campaigns that were focused on phasing out terrorism, the 2012 campaigns were focused on the Great Recession by improving the US economy, which was facing great challenges such as budget deficits and social insurance programs[5] . Obama was able to clinch the presidential seat after defeating Romney by a very narrow margin as his popularity has decreased over the four-year term he was in office.

The presidential elections and campaigns have experienced various similarities and differences over the years as outlined above. The progression of change from President Bush to President Obama has been significant to America’s economy and the fight against terrorism.

Bibiography

Cohen, Jeffrey. E. “The 2008 Presidential Election, Part I,” Presidential Studies Quarterly, 6 (2010): 5-22.

Panagopoulos, Coastas. Campaign Context and Preference Dynamics in U.S. Presidential Elections. Journal of Elections, Public Opinion & Parties, 22, no.2 (2012): 123-137.

Wattenberg, Martin. P. “2004 Presidential Election: An Introduction,” Presidential Studies Quarterly, 11, (2006): 13-25.

Wattenberg, Martin. P. “Elections: Personal Popularity in U.S. Presidential Elections,” Presidential Studies Quarterly 34, no.1(2004): 143-155.

[1] Martin Wattenberg P. “2004 Presidential Election: An Introduction,” Presidential Studies Quarterly, 11, (2006): 13-25.

[2] Ibid.

[3] Jeffrey Cohen E, “The 2008 Presidential Election, Part I,” Presidential Studies Quarterly, 6 (2010): 5-22.

[4] Martin Wattenberg P. “Elections: Personal Popularity in U.S. Presidential Elections,” Presidential Studies Quarterly, 34, no.1 (2004): 143-155.

[5] Coastas Panagopoulos. Campaign Context and Preference Dynamics in U.S. Presidential Elections. Journal of Elections, Public Opinion & Parties, 22, no.2 (2012): 123-137.