Sample Sociology Essay on Socialization and Current Events

Socialization and Current Events

Socialization is a term widely used to refer to the processes of acquiring and passing on norms, ideas, and acquisition of skills vital to interpersonal relationship within a given society. Secondary socialization, on the other hand, is a process that happens throughout the lifetime of an individual (Timur, 2011). The socialization happens from a developmental age of about five years. It involves a child’s ability to integrate acceptable behavior, learning what the world expects of him/her. It is then imperative to note that secondary socialization takes place beyond family, close acquaintances, and native community. This form of socialization is carried out through platforms like education centers, job places, religious gatherings, and more importantly the mass media.

Secondary socialization is best displayed by the learning structure (Timur, 2011). This is inclusive of being a beginner in a kindergarten and joining a distant college after attending senior school. After joining schools, children realize that the unconditional acceptance they received back home has faded away. Their performance and conduct form the basis of how they are judged. They have to embrace the dos and don’ts, rules of the institution for them to be approved by the staff. This is contrary to the fact that back at their homes, they were readily accepted by their parents. This enshrines into them a new culture far beyond the family ties. It also induces stress in them due to the challenges experienced when trying to gain acceptance into a new group.

Moreover, secondary socialization can occur when students move to a new location, such as joining a distant university (Timur, 2011). This also introduces the student to an objective world. This may involve traveling from a rural senior school to an urban college while others may involve transfer between countries. This means that the new students will have to learn, adapt, and cope with the new way of life encountered. From the above considerations, secondary socialization is crucial to existence. If the process fails, a person may not be in a position to possess sociocultural skills to work logically.

Financial inequality can also be viewed as economic inequality. It refers to a condition where earnings, wealth, and total assets are unequally distributed among a group of people or nations (Gilpin, 2014). This inequality may be viewed as a social problem due to some of its causes, which include nepotism, discrimination on the basis of gender and race, and inadequate abilities among some groups of people. Other major causes of financial inequality are increased use of computerized technology, leading to loss of manual jobs, family structure, and growing global markets rendering small-scale entrepreneurs jobless.

In recent times, financial inequality has been a concern among the countries struck by Ebola (Gilpin, 2014). African countries mainly Sierra Leone and Liberia have so far experienced the worst effect. Efforts to contain the disease seem futile due to imminent financial constraints in the developing world. On the other hand, the United States, which is a developed nation, has been able to counter attack the disease, leading to minimal deaths. This arises because of advanced system care and enough resources to enlighten the masses about the safety procedures. In contrast with the African countries, international help had to be chipped in to help combat economic collapse and unprecedented loss of lives. The effects of financial inequality may lead to civil wars and unhealthy competitions among other undesirable eventualities.

Social status refers to the rank held or thought to be occupied by an individual or a group of people within a community. Social mobility describes climbing the ladder from one social class to another or movement between defined strata to another. Due to social statuses, certain individuals may be viewed as superior to others (Kruglanski & Higgins, 2007). Some of the commonest bases for social status include wealth, race, gender, and education accomplishments. Particular races may be viewed as unimportant and intimidated.

An event clearly depicting social status is the recent shootings of African Americans in the U.S. Blacks who may be viewed as belonging to a lower social class are treated unfairly as compared to the Whites. Additionally, the failure to indict the policemen involved created mixed feelings that the Black population is inferior (Kruglanski & Higgins, 2007). Despite the shooting that happened in Ferguson, more Blacks were arrested as compared to their counterparts. From the racial arrests and killings, it is clear that social status can have negative effects on a society.

 

References

Gilpin, R. (2014). Ebola, Economics and Equality in Africa. Retrieved from http://africanarguments.org/?s=Ebola%2C+Economics+and+Equality+in+Africa

Kruglanski, A. W., & Higgins, E. T. (Eds.). (2007). Social psychology: Handbook of basic principles. New York City: Guilford Press. Retrieved from http://books.google.co.ke/books?id=WUuGS3gr9W4C&pg=PA689&lpg=PA689&dq=Who+attains+social+status+Journal+of+personality+and+social+psychology,+81+%281%29,+116&source=bl&ots=qx6KlNqVNZ&sig=AvB1RsU8LRLr52DvgFGBSfwLCmY&hl=en&sa=X&ei=zjKEVLGdI8PkoASVsoLQBA&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=Who%20attains%20social%20status%20Journal%20of%20personality%20and%20social%20psychology%2C%2081%20%281%29%2C%20116&f=false

Timur, P. (2011). Secondary socialisation. Retrieved from http://multigraffiti.blogspot.com/2011/04/secondary-socialisation.html